Grasshopper Field Study LDC Page

This page is designed to help you with your GFS/LDC narrative.

The purpose of an LDC (Literacy Design Collaborative) is to help you gain experience with reading, research and citations skills and apply them to a written piece of work.

Introductory Grasshopper Video # 1 - DIscovery

Introductory Grasshopper Video #2

Here are the steps to the process:

STEP 1

Read the "Rouge Wave" story from your Language Arts text as an example of the type of narrative you will write for the GFS/LDC

Complete your GFS/LDC Writer's Note Book (Part 1). Most of this work will be done in Science and some in LA class.

  • 2016 GFS/LDC Writer's Note Book (Part 1)

  • MODIFIED 2016 GFS/LDC Writer's Note Book (Part 1) FOR THOSE WHO QUALIFY ONLY!


In LA class, you may also read "The Boy Who Hunted Grasshoppers" as another narrative example related to grasshoppers.

GFS 2015 Stats NOTE: These stats will soon be replaced with 2016 stats after 9/16/16.

Article Resources
1.) Boggs, Johnny. "The Boy Who Hunted Grasshoppers." Boy's Life Magazine, 1 Sept. 2012. Web. 1 Sept. 2012.
<http://boyslife.org/wayback/#issue=nJGYuRFNM3QC&pg=5>.
2.)"Differential Grasshopper-Melanoplus Differentialis." UWL Website. Web. 19 Aug. 2015. http://bioweb.uwlax.edu/bio203/s2012/schiappa_char/adaptation.htm
3.)“Disturbance-National Wildlife Federation.” Disturbance - National Wildlife Federation. Web. 25 Aug. 2014.
<**http://www.nwf.org/Wildlife/Wildlife-Conservation/Disturbance.aspx**>.
4.)“Habitat Loss-National Wildlife Federation.” Habitat Loss - National Wildlife Federation. Web. 25 Aug.
2014. <**http://www.nwf.org/Wildlife/Threats-to-Wildlife/Habitat-Loss.aspx**>.
5.)The 2015 Palmyra Middle School Grasshopper Field Study.


STEP 2


On the last page of your LDC packet, create a ROUGH draft of your Non-Fiction LDC portion of your narrative.
  1. Re-read the first page of "Rouge Wave" from your language arts text (page3) to get a sense of how the author writes his non fiction set up (in italics).
  2. The narrative is themed on "Bold Actions". Take some time to think about how you want your narrative to be. What bold actions could grasshoppers in the field study have lived or encountered?
  3. Think about non-fiction bold action related content you could cite from our five sources to set the stage for your narrative.
  4. Create a rough draft (on the last page of your LDC packet) that uses ALL FIVE sources (listed below). Behind each source quote or reference used, put the "In-text" citation information in parenthesis. For example: Grasshoppers eat grass (Boggs 56).
  5. "Grasshoppers use their antenna to detect moisture in grass" (Palmyra)

Citation Sources and In-Text Citation Formatting


Boggs, Johnny. "The Boy Who Hunted Grasshoppers." Boy's Life Magazine, 1 Sept. 2012. Web. 1 Sept. 2012.
<https://boyslifeorg.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/bl_grasshoppers.pdf>.
In-text Citation for this resource would be: (Boggs #)


"Differential Grasshopper-Melanoplus Differentialis." UWL Website. Web. 19 Aug. 2015. http://bioweb.uwlax.edu/bio203/s2012/schiappa_char/adaptation.htm
In-text Citation for this resource would be: ("Differential")


“Disturbance-National Wildlife Federation.” Disturbance - National Wildlife Federation. Web. 25 Aug. 2014.
<**http://www.nwf.org/Wildlife/Wildlife-Conservation/Disturbance.aspx**>.
In-text Citation for this resource would be: ("Disturbance-National")


“Habitat Loss-National Wildlife Federation.” Habitat Loss - National Wildlife Federation. Web. 25 Aug.
2014. <**http://www.nwf.org/Wildlife/Threats-to-Wildlife/Habitat-Loss.aspx**>.
In-text Citation for this resource would be: ("Habitat")


Palmyra Middle School Grasshopper Field Study. 16 Sept. 2016.
In-text Citation for this resource would be: (Palmyra)



STEP 3


Write your narrative on the Google Doc and submit it to Google Classroom by Tuesday, September 27th.


LDC Grasshopper Field Study WRITING PROMPT:

Grasshopper Field Study WRITING Assignment:
Write a narrative about the grasshopper field study event. Use the story, “Rogue Wave,” from the ELA textbook as a model.
Requirements for Points in Life Science Class--
  • The first paragraph(s) are nonfiction information based on scientific facts, just like the italicized nonfiction paragraphs on pages 3 and 4 of “Rogue Wave” in the English Language Arts textbook.
  • The nonfiction paragraph(s) are typed in italics, following the example from the ELA textbook.
  • In the nonfiction paragraphs, you state at least FIVE FACTS you have learned about grasshoppers and their habitats. Include the following:
    • o Problems our grasshoppers have due to changes in their habitat
    • o How the grasshoppers deal with those problems based on what you learned from your class readings and the field study
    • o At least ONE FACT from each of the FIVE SOURCES for a minimum of FIVE FACTS
    • o Proper citations for your sources, including the following:
      • § Facts from the field study
      • § Facts from the story, “The Boy Who Hunted Grasshoppers,” presented in ELA class
      • § Facts from the THREE articles presented in science class
      • § Parenthesis around the number of the source after the sentence you are citing
      • § A “Works Cited” page as your last page, showing the citation sources copy/pasted there
Requirements for Points in English Language Arts (ELA) Class—
  • A fictionalized or nonfiction narrative story about the Grasshopper Field Study event is built upon and follows the facts presented in the italicized science paragraphs. That means that factual, scientific details about grasshoppers and their habitat are in the story. Sources do not need to be cited again in the story section below the italicized section.
  • The point of view is consistent and effective. Grasshoppers need to be anthropomorphized so that they talk and have feelings like people do while still doing things that real grasshoppers do.
    • o Third person option—A narrator outside the story tells about the grasshopper field study events.
    • o First person option—A grasshopper tells the story from its perspective.
  • A clear and engaging conflict, or problem, is established, developed with suspense, has a climactic turning point, and is resolved.
  • Transition words and phrases effectively guide the reader through a smooth, well-paced, chronological sequence of events.
  • Sensory language and precise, vivid description skillfully develop the setting and help shape the conflict and characters.
  • Dialogue is used effectively to develop characters and plot. Effective use includes proper punctuation.
  • A theme, or universal message, about life or human nature is evident.
  • Proper conventions of capitalization, usage, punctuation, and spelling are applied throughout.

LA Rubric



Remember to TYPE all of your narrative in a simple, black font, such as size 12 Arial.
HIGHLIGHT your black text as follows so that you remember to include these elements and so that Mrs. Flury is sure to notice them:
  • dialogue in yellow
  • transitions in green
  • sensory details in aqua.








Formatting Throughout the Document:
  • ● Type using a size 12 font that is easy to read, such as Arial.
  • ● Double space lines.
  • ● Use proper conventions of capitalization, usage, punctuation, and spelling.


LDC Narrative Task - Grasshopper Field Study (GFS) - Science Grading Rubric
Science components
4 Expert
3 Proficient
2 Emergent
1 Novice
Facts
Student includes 5 or more different facts from separate resources such as the Grasshopper Field Study and/or related articles read in L.A. or science class
*Acceptable sources noted below
Student includes 4or more different facts from separate resources such as the Grasshopper Field Study and/or related articles read in L.A. or science class
*Acceptable sources noted below
Student includes 3or more different facts from separate resources such as the Grasshopper Field Study and/or related articles read in L.A. or science class
*Acceptable sources noted below
Student includes 2 or less different facts from separate resources such as the Grasshopper Field Study and/or related articles read in L.A. or science class
*Acceptable sources noted below
Sources
Correctly cites each of the 5 different facts from 5 different sources from the acceptable works cited.
*Acceptable sources noted below
Correctly cites each of the 4 different facts from 5 different sources from the acceptable works cited.
*Acceptable sources noted below
Correctly cites each of the 3 different facts from 5 different sources from the acceptable works cited.
*Acceptable sources noted below
Correctly cites each of the 2 different facts from 5 different sources from the acceptable works cited.
*Acceptable sources noted below
Quality of the facts
All 5 facts contain exceptional depth, detail and accuracy
Most facts contain exceptional depth, detail and accuracy
Some facts contain exceptional depth, detail and accuracy
Few facts contain exceptional depth, detail and accuracy
Works Cited

Boggs, Johnny. "The Boy Who Hunted Grasshoppers." Boy's Life Magazine. 1 Sept. 2012. Web.
https://boyslifeorg.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/bl_grasshoppers.pdf

"Differential Grasshopper-Melanoplus Differentialis." UWL Website. Web. 19 Aug. 2015. http://bioweb.uwlax.edu/bio203/s2012/schiappa_char/adaptation.htm

“Disturbance-National Wildlife Federation.” Disturbance - National Wildlife Federation. Web. 25 Aug. 2014.
<**http://www.nwf.org/Wildlife/Wildlife-Conservation/Disturbance.aspx**>.

“Habitat Loss-National Wildlife Federation.” Habitat Loss - National Wildlife Federation. Web. 25 Aug.
2014. <**http://www.nwf.org/Wildlife/Threats-to-Wildlife/Habitat-Loss.aspx**>.

Palmyra Middle School Grasshopper Field Study. 16 Sept. 2016.

LDC Narrative Task - Grasshopper Field Study (GFS) Requirements and Rubrics for Language Arts and Science


NOTE for students with IEPs and 504s, your case manager will get with you as to specific modifications to meet your individual needs.